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Poetry

Published books of poetry written by Rosanna Warren.


Each Leaf Shines Separate (poems),
W. W. Norton, 1984

In this stunning first book, Rosanna Warren writes with wisdom, grace, and pure intelligence “as though to seize on a new life.” Exploring the complexities of nature and art, she traces continuous travail between the earth—in its tangle of roots and cyclical consolation—and the restless and protesting mind. Thus we encounter the struggle for sustaining generations of life in the villages of Europe, the ruins of Crete, a fresco or bas-relief.


Stained Glass (poems),
W. W. Norton, 1993

Lamont Poetry Prize, The Academy of American Poets

Stained Glass is a distinguished and elegiac book: somber, frequently bitter, but always invested with an authentic, quite marvelous aesthetic dignity.
— Harold Bloom
Tough-minded, beautifully crafted meditations...Stained Glass is a work of acute, uncompromising vision.
— Ploughshares

Departure (poems),
W. W. Norton, 2003

In this fourth book of her own poetry (the first since 1993’s much-honored Stained Glass), long and masterfully elaborate sentences and unrhymed stanzas follow the poet’s eye and mind across the landscapes of Europe and New England...Intensely personal work.
— Publishers Weekly
The poems in Departure exemplify the radiance that poems can shed, even when telling the darkest and most elegiac of stories.
— David Ferry
Rosanna Warren lives in our tarnished, everyday, ramshackle world of loss, anguish, and sacrifice, but she inhabits almost as vividly a realm of classic purity: and in some of her best, most moving poems she dwells in both regions at once, and within, as it seems, the same breath. It is a beautiful miracle of bilocation.
— Anthony Hecht

Ghost in a Red Hat (poems),
W. W. Norton, 2011

A Boston Globe Best Poetry Book of 2011

A significant contribution to the national imaginary.
— The New York Review of Books
Original and tensile in language, saturated with intellect, feeling, deeply researched knowledge—the range of reach here is stunning.
— Jane Hirshfield
Achieves a delicate balance between structural solidity and movement...Warren’s latest poems tend to veil their complexity in understatement.
— Harvard Review
Tautly elegant...This deeply personal set of poems beautifully wanders and wonders.
— The Rumpus
This is a beautiful, electric book.
— Frank Bidart
These poems are what Wallace Stevens called an enlargement of life.
— Harold Bloom

Snow Day (poems), 
Palaemon Press, 1981

Rosanna Warren’s poems are like pure water falling from a hill reflecting light and giving cool sustenance. They are like pure intelligence. They deal with nature, love, historical persons, old and new events in depths of perceptions realized in refusals of too much passion, too much despair. Her poems are clear, elegantly poised, refreshing to the taste and good to possess.
— Richard Eberhart
Snow Day is like no other first book that I have read. None of its risks is calculated, none of its successes approximate. It is filled with a clear, unforced intelligence. Its dense music and unwillingness to forget the world in its most fugitive guises give it a beautiful intensity that would be remarkable in any book.
— Mark Strand

Earthworks

EARTHWORKS: SELECTED POEMS, the American Philosophical Society Press, 2016.

In this inspiring volume, Rosanna Warren chronologically arranges poems selected from her four published collections of poetry. She places the poetry “under the protection of two poetry saints: William Blake and Hart Crane,” and convincingly reminds us that “poems have work to do: to bear witness, to cry out, to lament, to praise. They should be psalms for their time.”